Thursday, April 4, 2019

Here is How You Can Fight Fake News on WhatsApp and FaceBook | SingleWindowTech

“Totta Totta To –oa tta”
This ad is striking your TV screens frequently these days. Daily Hunt has devised a good idea to stop plagiarism and stop people to forward any statements they have heard from somewhere else by breaking the message chain. A good step is being taken by Daily Hunt before General Elections 2019. A much-needed step indeed. Various Social Platforms have come forward to curb any activity which is of political subject and false grounds.

Fight Fake News on WhatsApp and Facebook

Verify Forwarded Message on Whatsapp:

Now, people in India can submit uncertain information or rumors they have received to the Checkpoint Tipline on WhatsApp +91-9643-000-888. Launched by PROTO, an India-based media skilling startup, this Tipline will help create a database of rumors to study misinformation during elections for Checkpoint – a research project commissioned and technically assisted by WhatsApp.

  • The response will indicate if the information is classified as ‘true’, ‘false’, ‘misleading’, ‘disputed’ or ‘out of scope’, and include any other related information. 
  • Pictures, video links or texts in Hindi, Telugu, Bengali, Malayalam, and English will be reviewed by WhatsApp.

How To Do It?


Add +91-9643-000-888 in WhatsApp contacts, now when you receive a suspicious message, share that message to this number. 

When a WhatsApp user shares a suspicious message with the tipline, PROTO’s verification center will seek to respond and inform the user if the claim made in the message shared is verified or not. 



The response will indicate if the information is classified as true, false, misleading, disputed or out of scope and include any other related information that is available. This center can review rumors in the form of pictures, video links or text and will cover four regional languages including Hindi, Telugu, Bengali and Malayalam, other than English. PROTO will also encourage grassroots organizations to submit rumors circulating across different regions in India during the election period.

Dig Deeper Media and Meedan, who have previously worked on misinformation-related projects around the world, are helping PROTO to develop the verification and research frameworks for India. Meedan has developed the technology to support the verification of rumors and will maintain the database of rumors that have been processed. To do so, they have expanded their Check platform (developed for recent elections in Mexico and France) and integrated it with the WhatsApp Business API, to receive and respond to messages at scale.

Challenges:
Whatsapp has shown its intention as a way for people to identify fake news and avoid spreading it; there are two key challenges lying forward to tackle. The first is speed; the longer it takes to verify information, the less inclined people might be to check their facts before forwarding them along.

Next, the news of this tipline needs to reach a wider audience than just those reading tech blogs. It’d be good to see this built into Whatsapp somehow, either as a ‘Verify this’ option alongside the forward button in chats or as a pop-up that encourages people to try sending rumors to the tipline before sending them along. Hopefully, the company will invest in offline initiatives to make more people across India aware of this feature so they can protect themselves from fake news during these sensitive times.

Verify a Link Shared on Facebook:

Facebook is also trying to combat this issue earlier than Whatsapp. Antonia Woodford, product manager at Facebook, published the first “Hunt for False News” blog post, examining three false stories that circulated on the site before they were debunked. Two of the stories were caught by Facebook and third-party fact-checkers, but the last story was completely missed. 

The point of the series is to be more transparent with users about how stories circulate on Facebook, especially in the wake of fake news around election periods being a continuous talking point.

Facebook More Information About This Link

Facebook will also provide biographical information for the author as well as links to their other stories. The visual signal is a little "about this article" icon near the bottom-left corner of the article's image. Tap on it, and we'll get more information. 

Facebook has said that it notifies users and page administrators when a story they had previously shared is debunked by a fact checker, but that hardly guarantees they'll actually see the message (particularly in an era when there's an overwhelming amount of spammy Facebook notifications, to begin with). It also does nothing to address those who may have seen the original post somewhere on Facebook but didn't turn around and share it themselves.

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